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The Intellectual Foundation of Information Organization Elaine Svenonius

By: Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Series: Digital libraries and electronic publishingPublication details: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2000.Description: xiv, 255 pages: 24 cmISBN:
  • 9780262512619
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 025.3 SVE
Contents:
Information Organization Bibliographic Objectives Bibliographic Entities Bibliographic Language Principle of Description Work Language Document Language Subject Language: Introduction, Vocabulary Selection, amd Classification Subject Language: Referential and Relational Semantics Subject Language: Referential and Relational Semantics Subject-Language Syntax
Summary: Integrating the disparate disciplines of descriptive cataloging, subject cataloging, indexing, and classification, the book adopts a conceptual framework that views the process of organizing information as the use of a special language of description called a bibliographic language.Instant electronic access to digital information is the single most distinguishing attribute of the information age. The elaborate retrieval mechanisms that support such access are a product of technology. But technology is not enough. The effectiveness of a system for accessing information is a direct function of the intelligence put into organizing it. Just as the practical field of engineering has theoretical physics as its underlying base, the design of systems for organizing information rests on an intellectual foundation. The subject of this book is the systematized body of knowledge that constitutes this foundation.Integrating the disparate disciplines of descriptive cataloging, subject cataloging, indexing, and classification, the book adopts a conceptual framework that views the process of organizing information as the use of a special language of description called a bibliographic language. The book is divided into two parts. The first part is an analytic discussion of the intellectual foundation of information organization. The second part moves from generalities to particulars, presenting an overview of three bibliographic languages: work languages, document languages, and subject languages. It looks at these languages in terms of their vocabulary, semantics, and syntax. The book is written in an exceptionally clear style, at a level that makes it understandable to those outside the discipline of library and information science.
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Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
General Books General Books CUTN Central Library Generalia Non-fiction 025.3 SVE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Checked out to ANILA SULOCHANA (17050A) 21/04/2022 29967

Information Organization Bibliographic Objectives Bibliographic Entities Bibliographic Language Principle of Description Work Language Document Language Subject Language: Introduction, Vocabulary Selection, amd Classification Subject Language: Referential and Relational Semantics Subject Language: Referential and Relational Semantics Subject-Language Syntax

Integrating the disparate disciplines of descriptive cataloging, subject cataloging, indexing, and classification, the book adopts a conceptual framework that views the process of organizing information as the use of a special language of description called a bibliographic language.Instant electronic access to digital information is the single most distinguishing attribute of the information age. The elaborate retrieval mechanisms that support such access are a product of technology. But technology is not enough. The effectiveness of a system for accessing information is a direct function of the intelligence put into organizing it. Just as the practical field of engineering has theoretical physics as its underlying base, the design of systems for organizing information rests on an intellectual foundation. The subject of this book is the systematized body of knowledge that constitutes this foundation.Integrating the disparate disciplines of descriptive cataloging, subject cataloging, indexing, and classification, the book adopts a conceptual framework that views the process of organizing information as the use of a special language of description called a bibliographic language. The book is divided into two parts. The first part is an analytic discussion of the intellectual foundation of information organization. The second part moves from generalities to particulars, presenting an overview of three bibliographic languages: work languages, document languages, and subject languages. It looks at these languages in terms of their vocabulary, semantics, and syntax. The book is written in an exceptionally clear style, at a level that makes it understandable to those outside the discipline of library and information science.

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