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Viruses : more friends than foes / Karin Moelling, University of Zurich, Switzerland & Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany.

By: Möelling, Karin | , 1943-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Singapore ; Hackensack, NJ : World Scientific, ©2017Description: xiv, 403 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9789813147812 ; 9789813147829 .Subject(s): Viruses | Microbiology | Well-beingDDC classification: 616.910
Contents:
1. Viruses -- not as you pictured them 2. Viruses -- how they make us ill 3. Retroviruses and immortality 4. Viruses and cancer 5. Viruses that do not make us ill 6. Viruses -- "giant" as cells 7. Viruses as fossils 8. Viruses -- our oldest ancestors? 9. Viruses and antiviral defense 10. Viruses and Phages for survival? 11. Viruses for gene therapy 12. Viruses and the future
Summary: Influenza, AIDS, and Ebola: Viruses are normally defined as pathogens. Most viruses are, however, not enemies or killers. Well-known virologist and cancer researcher Karin Moelling describes surprising insights about a completely new and unexpected world of viruses. Viruses are ubiquitous, in the oceans, our environment, in animals, plants, bacteria, in our body, even in our genomes. They influence our weather, can contribute to control obesity, and can surprisingly be applied against threatening multi-resistant bacteria. The success story of the viruses started more than 3.5 billion years ago in the dawn of life when even cells did not exist. They are the superpower of life. There are more viruses on earth than stars in the sky. Viruses are everywhere. Some of them are incredibly ancient. Many viruses are hundredfold smaller than bacteria, but others are tenfold bigger and they were discovered only recently -- the giant viruses, even deep within the permafrost where they were reactivated after 30,000 years. The author talks about a completely new world of viruses, which are based on the most recent, in part her own research results. Could viruses have been our oldest ancestors? Have viruses even "invented" social behavior, do they lead to geniuses such as Mozart or Einstein -- or alternatively to cancer? They can help to cure cancer. In this book, the author made a clear distinction between what is fact and what is her vision. This book is written for a general audience and not just for the experts. Its aim is to stimulate thinking, and perhaps to attract more young scientists to enter this field of research.
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Medicine, Technology & Management
Non-fiction 616.910 MOE (Browse shelf) Available 40217
Browsing CUTN Central Library Shelves , Shelving location: Medicine, Technology & Management , Collection code: Non-fiction Close shelf browser
616.904 WEE Alcamo's microbes and society / 616.9041 PER Molecular microbiology : 616.9047582 DEC Molecular diagnosis of infectious diseases / 616.910 MOE Viruses : 616.91 SHO Understanding viruses / 616.920 BRO Virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens / 616.936 ADE Genetic control of malaria and dengue /

1. Viruses -- not as you pictured them 2. Viruses -- how they make us ill 3. Retroviruses and immortality 4. Viruses and cancer 5. Viruses that do not make us ill 6. Viruses -- "giant" as cells 7. Viruses as fossils 8. Viruses -- our oldest ancestors? 9. Viruses and antiviral defense 10. Viruses and Phages for survival? 11. Viruses for gene therapy 12. Viruses and the future

Influenza, AIDS, and Ebola: Viruses are normally defined as pathogens. Most viruses are, however, not enemies or killers. Well-known virologist and cancer researcher Karin Moelling describes surprising insights about a completely new and unexpected world of viruses. Viruses are ubiquitous, in the oceans, our environment, in animals, plants, bacteria, in our body, even in our genomes. They influence our weather, can contribute to control obesity, and can surprisingly be applied against threatening multi-resistant bacteria. The success story of the viruses started more than 3.5 billion years ago in the dawn of life when even cells did not exist. They are the superpower of life. There are more viruses on earth than stars in the sky. Viruses are everywhere. Some of them are incredibly ancient. Many viruses are hundredfold smaller than bacteria, but others are tenfold bigger and they were discovered only recently -- the giant viruses, even deep within the permafrost where they were reactivated after 30,000 years. The author talks about a completely new world of viruses, which are based on the most recent, in part her own research results. Could viruses have been our oldest ancestors? Have viruses even "invented" social behavior, do they lead to geniuses such as Mozart or Einstein -- or alternatively to cancer? They can help to cure cancer. In this book, the author made a clear distinction between what is fact and what is her vision. This book is written for a general audience and not just for the experts. Its aim is to stimulate thinking, and perhaps to attract more young scientists to enter this field of research.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

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